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Kate concentrates her practice in construction litigation and assists contractors, subcontractors, design professionals, and owners on both private and public projects. She provides clients with support and advice regarding all stages of litigation, including initiation of litigation, written discovery, depositions, research, the preparation of motions and briefs, and trial preparation. Kate also has experience assisting clients in pursuing alternative dispute resolution methods, such as mediation and arbitration.

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Just a few short weeks ago, college students were in the midst of their spring semester, contemplating spring break, finals, graduation, and athletic conferences. At the same time, members of higher education institutions anticipated the release of the Department of Education’s (DOE) final version of the proposed Title IX regulations. As of the beginning of the year, the DOE sent a finalized version of the regulations to the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), indicating that the regulations were in the “Final Rule Stage.” The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) website indicates that the meetings on the proposed regulations concluded as of March 27, 2020.

Continue Reading Correspondence Encourages the DOE Not to Release New Title IX Regulations Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

In November 2018, the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) proposed new Title IX regulations concerning sexual harassment, including sexual assault, and received over 100,000 comments during the public comment period. As of today, the regulations have not been finalized. However, four congresspersons recently introduced legislation in the House of Representatives that would prohibit implementation of the proposed Title IX regulations.

The bill, H.R. 5388, introduced by Representative Elissa Slotkin and co-sponsored by Representatives Ayanna Pressley, Jackie Speier, and Annie Kuster, provides that “the Secretary of Education may not issue or enforce certain rules that weaken the enforcement of the prohibition of sex discrimination applicable under Title IX.” Specifically, the bill states that the Secretary of Education may not (1) take any action to implement, enforce, and/or give effect to the proposed regulations, or (2) propose or issue any rule or guidance that is substantially the same as the proposed regulations. Rep. Slotkin’s press release states that the new regulations “could have a chilling effect on students’ willingness to come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct and would be a detriment to survivors and to students in general and the academic institutions they attend.”


Continue Reading House Reps Introduce Last-Minute Bill That Would Block Proposed Title IX Regulations Before Their Imminent Release

As expected, the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) recently released proposed Title IX regulations, specifically concerning sexual harassment, including sexual assault. This is significant because the DOE has never addressed these issues through regulation. In the past, guidance has only been available through informal resources, such as the 2011 Dear Colleague Letter and the 2014 Guidance/Q&A. As discussed in previous blog posts, these new regulations, if adopted, would constitute a substantial departure from prior guidance. 
Continue Reading Changes Ahead: Department of Education Proposes Revisions to Title IX Regulations